BET-SHEBA OUTREACH INC.
BET-SHEBA OUTREACH INC.

Sexual Predator Warning Signs:

 

Did you know ?

 

  • Not all perpetrators are adults—an estimated 23% of reported cases of child sexual abuse are perpetrated by individuals under the age of 18.

        

Tips on Spotting a Sexual Predator:

 

  • Often offend where they won't get caught — when they have misdirected people's attention
  • Often married or in relationships
  • Offend when the victim is handy
  • Not always strangers, often family members, family friends and neighbors
  • Most attracted to adults
  • Good manipulators (seduction is an integral part)
  • Overly self-indulgent
  • Arrogant
  • Sexualize, objectify women
  • Users of various kinds of pornography
  • Typically known as rationalizers, intellectualizers, justifiers
  • Great helpers — are there to lend a helping hand — prey on people in need, when they can insinuate themselves in your life
  • Use stressful and vulnerable situations to get in — they find a need they can fill and they use that to get next to the victim

         

Common Attributes of Child Molesters: 
 

  • Pedophiles are notoriously friendly, nice, kind, engaging and likeable.
  • Pedophiles target their victims, often insinuating themselves into that child's life through their family, school, house of worship, sports, and hobbies.
  • Pedophiles are professional con artists and are experts at getting children and families to trust them.
  • Pedophiles will smile at you, look you right in the eye and make you believe they are trustworthy

 

 

 

Strangers and Acquaintances: 

You may not necessarily know these people very well, or only by name/face alone (a neighbor, a coach, a parent of another child you know). In order to gain access to your child, they usually try to establish a rapport with the parent as well as the child, but in some cases, they are less careful about hiding their intentions. Be cautious for the following behaviors/characteristics:  
  • Volunteers or works with children but does not have children of their own, or child friendly toys - video games, tree house, train sets/doll collections etc 
  • Spends more time with children than adults or peers - may even come off as immature and childish themselves 
  • Has a "favorite" child they seem to spend time with (which may vary from year to year)
  • Gives gifts or special privileges for no apparent reason 
  • Overly affectionate/playful with children - hugging, tickling, wrestling, holding or having a child sit on their lap
  • Disregards "no" "stop" or other efforts from a child to avoid physical contact 
  • Long stares or periods of watching a child
  • Comments or conversation about a child's appearance - which may even take a turn for the inappropriate 
  • May exhibit a sense that they feel they have special rights/privileges above others
  • Eagerness to learn details of your personal (possibly romantic) life and your child and their interests
  • Flattery of you, your child, their talents and likewise, they may boast about their own successes/accomplishments, charitable work, generosity etc 
  • If you are a single parent (especially a mother) - this person may be a new or potential romantic interest that comes off as "too good to be true" or anyone that seems interested in filling in as a fatherly role for your child. 
  • Seems to like the very same things that your child is interested in 
  • Tries to establish a sense of camaraderie with your child and draw your child away from you "I know how parents are" "you're old enough to go alone". 
  • Attempts to make you doubt your protective instincts "you're not one of those helicopter parents, are you?" 
  • Offers to "help out" with your child - a stranger that may offer to walk them to an arcade while you're shopping at the mall, or an acquaintance that offers to watch or give your child a ride to soccer practice when you find yourself in a bind. 
  • If your child is particularly talented (musically, artistically, athletically, or is involved in pageants etc) and someone approaches you with opportunities that seem like they would benefit your child - private lessons/photography shoots/meeting scouts etc 
  • Someone that suggests a child is "troubled" or prone to lying (to discredit future claims of abuse by the child.) 

 

 

Family, Friends, and People of Authority:

These are people you, most likely, have known for some time, trust with you child and/or enjoy their company. You may see some of these signs and pass them off as normal behavior - and in some cases, they may be. And in some cases, this person is not necessarily looking to prey on children, but finds him/herself with an opportunity to take advantage of access, trust, and familiarity with a parent and/or child. (You'll note some of these were listed above.)  Be cautious for: 
  • Spends more time with children than adults or peers - they may even come off as immature and childish 
  • Overly affectionate/playful with children - hugging, tickling, wrestling, holding or having a child sit on their lap
  • Has a "favorite" child they seem to spend time with (which may vary from year to year)
  • Gives gifts or special privileges for no apparent reason 
  • Comments or conversation about a child's appearance - which may even take a turn for the inappropriate - may make flirtatious remarks to the child 
  • Disregards "no" "stop" or other efforts from a child to avoid physical contact 
  • May exhibit a sense that they feel they have special rights/privileges above others
  • Long stares or periods of watching a child
  • Minimizes the need to respect privacy when dressing/going to the bathroom. May try to normalize nudity around children
  • Someone that communicates with a child in private - via social media, text message, email etc 
  • Someone that spends a lot of time viewing pornography, and especially anyone that views child pornography (this may seem obvious, but viewing child pornography is not an interest or curiosity - it is participation in a crime of sexual abuse upon a child.) 
  • A person that seeks opportunities to spend time alone with a child (most likely frequently) may even offer or take them on trips where they are alone for overnight or longer.  
  • Someone that may be going through a difficult period in life and  - job loss, divorce, a death in the family - something that may add stress, feelings of depression, low self-esteem and/or loneliness. (These are common indicators that someone who would not be considered a pedophile, may turn to sexually abusing a child as a means to cope with unhappiness.) 
  • Someone that suggests a child is "troubled" or prone to lying (to discredit future claims of abuse by the child.) 
  •  

Female Abusers:

Women are more likely to sexually abuse boys, and unlike most male offenders, female offenders often abuse a child in conjunction with a male - often a spouse or partner, she may abuse a child to please the other offender. Be cautious for: 
  • Women that are in unstable or controlling relationships, or seem incapable/fearful of their partner leaving them, or being alone. 
  • Substance abuse problems. 
  • Has a "favorite" child they seem to spend time with - gives them special attention, gifts, privileges (which may vary from year to year)
  • Overly affectionate/playful with children - hugging, tickling, wrestling, holding or having a child sit on their lap
  • Minimizes the need to respect privacy when dressing/going to the bathroom. May try to normalize nudity around children and/or use their bodies to "teach" the child about sexuality 
  • May exhibit a sense that they feel they have special rights/privileges above others
  • Someone that communicates with a child in private - via social media, text message, email etc 
  • A person that seeks opportunities to spend time alone with a child (most likely frequently) may even offer or take them on trips where they are alone for overnight or longer.  
  • Someone that may be going through a difficult period in life and  - job loss, divorce, a death in the family - something that may add stress, feelings of depression, low self-esteem and/or loneliness. (These are common indicators that someone who would not be considered a pedophile, may turn to sexually abusing a child as a means to cope with unhappiness.) 
  • Someone that suggests a child is "troubled" or prone to lying (to discredit future claims of abuse by the child.) 

 

Juvenile Offenders: 

Juvenile offenders are estimated to be responsible for approximately 40% of all child sexual abuse, yet they are the least discussed type of offenders.  Most juvenile offenders are over the age of 12. The reality is, you may see these behaviors in your own child, not necessarily someone who is a threat to your child. As adults, it is our responsibility to guide and take action if we feel our child may exhibit signs he/she could sexually abuse another child.  Be vigilant for: 
  • Children that are or have previously experienced abuse - physical, emotional, or sexual and are not in therapy. 
  • Children that exhibit bullying, aggressive, or controlling behavior
  • May exhibit a sense that they feel they have special rights/privileges above others  
  • Children that view pornography 
  • Gift giving or special privileges for another child 
  • Children that have not been educated on human sexuality and proper/responsible sexual behavior (In such cases, the child may abuse other children out of curiosity (with a limited understanding that their behavior is wrong) - but the act is still abusive upon the child victim.) Hazing may also fall under this category. 
  • Children that have a negative view of females (if you find your child is referring to girls as "bitches" "hoes" or "sluts" - it's not just slang, it's derogatory objectification. 

 

What Else We Can Do To Protect Children?


Bet-Sheba Outreach Inc. Empowers Women To End The Cycle Of Domestic Violence And Sexual Abuse Against Women & Children !

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